Author Archives: tgf

More Than This? Looking for Your Feedback

Hello everyone,

I’m crowdsourcing something very special that I hope to be able to tell you all about soon. To wit:

Would you please email me (godgrrl@gmail.com) and tell me what your reaction to this song is?

“More Than This” by Peter Gabriel

How does it make you feel? How do you relate? What’s it describing? What does it mean to you?

I’d be much obliged.

Grazie a tutti!

Below are the lyrics:

i woke up and the world outside was dark
all so quiet before the dawn
opened up the door and walked outside
the ground was cold

i walked until i couldn’t walk anymore
to a place i’d never been
there was something stirring in the air
in front of me, i could see

more than this
more than this
so much more than this
there is something else there
when all that you had has all gone
and more than this
i stand
feeling so connected
and i’m all there
right next to you

it started when i saw the ship go down
i saw them struggle in the sea
and suddenly the picture disappears
in front of me

now we’re busy making all our busy plans
on foundations built to last
but nothing fades as fast as the future
and nothing clings like the past, until we can see

more than this
more than this
so much more than this
there is something out there
more than this
it’s coming through
and more than this
i stand alone and so connected
and I’m all there
right next to you

oh then it’s alright
when with every day another bit falls away
oh but it’s still alright, alright, alright
and like words together we can make some sense

much more than this
way beyond imagination
much more than this
beyond the stars
with my head so full
so full of fractured pictures
and i’m all there
right next to you
so much more than this
there is something else there
when all that you had has all gone
and more than this
i’m alone
feeling so connected
and i’m all there right next to you

more than this
more than this
more than this

Categories: GODSTUFF | Leave a comment

Why Tony Campolo’s LGBTQ Reversal is Evangelicalism’s Tipping Point

Tony Campolo. Image via TonyCampolo.org.

Tony Campolo. Image via TonyCampolo.org.

That crashing sound you heard Monday morning was waves of change breaching the levees of the evangelical Christian world when one of its most venerable icons, the Rev. Tony Campolo, came out in favor of full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the life of the church.

While his name may not be as familiar outside the evangelical bubble as his contemporary, the Rev. Billy Graham, Campolo, 80, is undeniably a pillar of the evangelical world and has been for close to 60 years.

Both Campolo and Graham, 96, are best known and beloved first and foremost as preachers largely unencumbered by overt denominational or political biases. Like Graham, Campolo also has been a spiritual counselor to U.S. presidents and has played the role of public pastor in times of national sorrow and joy. (Since I first heard him deliver a version of it during chapel when I was a student at Wheaton College in 1989, I cannot recall a single Holy Week passing without hearing his classic “It’s Friday But Sunday’s Coming!” homily at least once.)

Graham and Campolo, both Baptist by tradition and creed, have been among the leading voices of mainstream evangelicalism, and their influence spans several generations. Together they helped shape the direction and expansiveness of the church as it attempted to navigate H. Richard Niebhur’s Christ and Culture paradigms and be in the world but not of it in the midst of ever increasing pluralism.

So when Campolo posted a statement on his web site this week announcing that he had changed his mind about homosexuality and was “urging the church to be more welcoming” to LGBTQ people, it was a big deal.

A very big deal.

Continue reading HERE 

Categories: GODSTUFF | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

To Let It God and So To Find A Way: U2, (A)Live with Grief and Grace

Photo illustration of U2 (from original images shot at the band's Vancouver concerts, May 14-15, 2015, by Cathleen Falsani. All rights reserved.

Photo illustration of U2 (from original images shot at the band’s Vancouver concerts, May 14-15, 2015, by Cathleen Falsani. All rights reserved.

“Comfort me.”

“COMFORT ME.”

“COMFORT ME! COMFORT ME!! COMFORT ME!!!”

Bono is standing at the edge of the stage that runs the length of The Forum arena in Inglewood, Calif., howling that word—comfort—at the top if his lungs before a crowd of 17,000.

The 55-year-old rock star is shouting—at God, to God—a prayer that has become an all-too familiar litany of the brokenhearted for the U2 family in recent months. Fewer than 24 hours earlier, in the wee hours of May 27, the band’s longtime tour manager and a fixture in the U2 community, Dennis Sheehan, died of an apparent heart attack in his Los Angeles hotel room.

Not just any band could take their fans by the hands and say, essentially, please walk with us through the valley of the shadow of death. We’re one, but we’re not the same; we get to carry each other …

But since its inception in 1976, the band formed by four teenage boys from Dublin’s hardscrabble north side has opened a vein, sharing their most vulnerable moments and struggles with anyone who would listen.

And sorrow has visited the U2 family far too often this season.

Continue reading HERE

Categories: GODSTUFF | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Photo Essay from Nepal: Bahini (Little Sisters)

Click on the photo below to view the photo essay “Bahini” from my recent sojourn in Nepal after the first of two massive earthquakes struck the tiny Himalayan nation, on my photography site Flaneur.Guru.

One of a dozen girls who live at the Chhahari home for children (many of whom are orphans) in Kathmandu, Nepal, tries on a pair of flower-shaped sunglasses (to go with her face mask) earlier this month. Photo by Cathleen Falsani for Religion Dispatches.

One of a dozen girls who live at the Chhahari home for children (many of whom are orphans) in Kathmandu, Nepal, tries on a pair of flower-shaped sunglasses (to go with her face mask) earlier this month. Photo by Cathleen Falsani for Religion Dispatches.

Categories: GODSTUFF | Leave a comment

Photo Essay from Nepal: Puja

Click on the photo below to view the first of several photo essays from Nepal on my photo website, Flaneur.Guru

Two young Nepali men stand near a huge cauldron of incense in front of the Buddha Stupa in Boudhanath, Nepal earlier this month. Photo by Cathleen Falsani.

Two young Nepali men stand near a huge cauldron of incense in front of the Buddha Stupa in Boudhanath, Nepal earlier this month. Photo by Cathleen Falsani.

Categories: GODSTUFF | Leave a comment

Ministries of Presence: A Report from Nepal

Photo of children playing on a rooftop in Kathmandu a week after The Great Earthquake of April 24, 2015. Photo by Cathleen Falsani for Religion Dispatches.

Photo of children playing on a rooftop in Kathmandu a week after The Great Earthquake of April 24, 2015. Photo by Cathleen Falsani for Religion Dispatches.

KATHMANDU, Nepal—The Boeing 737 loaded with relief supplies and caregivers touched down at Tribhuvan International Airport six days (nearly to the minute) after the first of two cataclysmic earthquakes wrecked havoc on the tiny Himalayan nation of Nepal.

Joining me aboard the flight from Singapore were a few other journalists from the United States and Europe, a team from the China Lingshan International Rescue in their distinctive fire engine red uniforms, and several dozen surgeons from South Africa who had come to Nepal with Gift of the Giver organization, an NGO founded in 1992 by a Sufi sheik from Istanbul.

Among us were Christians, Hindus, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, Sikhs, Jains—people of good will of many religious traditions and none at all. What we had in common was a desire to help the gentle people of Nepal (one of the poorest nations in the world) who had suffered through the devastation of an earthquake on April 24 so massive that it actually moved the global satellite positioning of its capital city by nearly 10 feet.

For some of us, that assistance took the form of pulling corpses and a few miraculous survivors from the concrete and brick ruins of homes, businesses, and even houses of worship leveled by the first earthquake. (A second earthquake of nearly the same size—7.3 on the Richter scale—struck Nepal on May 11, the day after I returned to California from Nepal.)

Others—the healers from Africa and elsewhere—would offer relief to the traumatized during grueling shifts in Nepal’s overwhelmed hospitals, in surgical theaters, setting broken bones, stitching wounds, and compassionate bedside care.

Interspersed among us, undoubtedly, were those hoping to offer some kind of spiritual aid, solace, or direction to the Nepalese. In generations past, we might simply have labeled this cohort “missionaries,” visitors hoping to share their version of the gospel truth with the broken and brokenhearted.

Continue reading the entire report at Religion Dispatches HERE

Categories: GODSTUFF | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 26,302 other followers

%d bloggers like this: